jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Fragments (Side))
Out of the images pulled from the old drive, I also have photos from a second site we visited on that cold February afternoon - a former filling station. It wasn't much. The neighborhood was sketchy which probably contributed to the demise of this former Raceway gas station (petrol station). With the cold, the locals didn't choose to come see what I was doing, so a few photos were had.

Abandoned 052FCa
We're sorry but this number is no longer in service...

Rollin down the highway )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Headshot)
Sorry folks, I would have posted these photos almost two weeks ago, but I got called away on a very short notice business trip. That also why several moderated posts didn’t get approved till this morning.

Location #3 – The Swift Meat Packing Complex
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It was hard to find a wall or surface that didn’t have a fresh coat of paint. If anything, as discouraged as it should be, the paint sealed walls were actually better preserved and wear was limited in those areas. That said tagging is a felony in some areas.

Read more... )
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Abandoned Places – Fort Worth, TX (Dec 12) – part 3

By the 1960’s, the Swift Fort Worth plant had already suffered through several major strikes and the site was in need of major modernization. The former Armour Meat Plant to the north of this complex was already closed as ranchers increasingly moved their herds to smaller markets by truck and smaller local railheads. The Swift Company had also diversified substantially into soap, transportation (they owned Greyhound Bus Company) and even insurance. In 1963-4, Swift began the process of shutting down the plant. As has been said, now the former complex is like a small ghost town tucked into the heart of Fort Worth.

Location #3 – The Swift Meat Packing Complex

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Read more... )
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Abandoned Places – Fort Worth, TX (Dec 12) – part 3

There are limited advantages to going on an abandoned site hunt on a weekday. People are at work, traffic is greater and the risk of being seen at some sites is much higher. Going to a location adjacent to one of Fort Worth’s biggest entertainment and tourist draws on a weekday worked beautifully. Being the dead of winter helped too but as mentioned, it really wasn’t cold.

Ft Worth was built as a cattle town. The stockyards and slaughterhouses processed millions of cattle and was on of the primary point that ranchers and cowboys would bring their products to market for the southwest. There were over 20 slaughterhouses and meat packing plants in and around the stockyards, but by the 1920’s Armour Meats and Swift Meat Company were the biggest and most influential.

Location #3 – The Swift Meat Packing Complex
Swift Sigh Sign photo DSC06266FCa.jpg

In it’s heyday, the Ft Worth Swift plant was the company’s second largest operation (Chicago was the largest). To the north of the complex was it’s biggest rival, Armour and Company. In the 1950’s that dramatically changed when Swift bought Armour’s meat business.

Read more... )
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On that warmer than expected afternoon progressed, my companion and I started wandering north through downtown Fort Worth. Warmer than average was probably a misnomer; because it was in the upper-60’s and pleasant… in mid December. The next place we found was unexpected but worth a quick walk around. The Ellis Bros Pecan Company was one of Texas’ premiere nut vendors. Their warehouse was along the same train sidings and spurs that handled cargo, cattle and such heading ‘back east.’

Location #2 – Ellis Pecan Co
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This building has a remarkable history I never would have imagined:
http://www.fortwortharchitecture.com/north/ellispecan.htm . For me it’s a rare thing to give out a location, but this site is scheduled to be renovated and it was also VERY securely locked up. This is a Texas historical site and situated amidst a number of very active businesses.

Read more... )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Headshot)
Last winter, I went to Ft. Worth to visit a dear friend and do an extended modeling shoot with her. While I was visiting this amazing lady, she indulged my passion for abandoned sites. Given Ft. Worth’s history as a gateway to the old west and its slow change from a blue collar meat packing town to a technology and manufacturing center; I knew there had to be some cool site. I researched a few places, on-line, checked several community & photo blogs and asked her for ideas of things she’d seen. The results for a day’s wander were exceptional.

Location #1 – Downtown
Fort Worth grew for up as a cow town and the rail hub. Cattle were shipped east to a hungry nation and goods were shipped west to build the growing communities on the frontier. Times change and the transportation hub shifted away from downtown leaving this monument to those days.

 photo DSC06157FCa.jpg
Texas Express Company AKA The Texas and Pacific Freight Terminal

Read more... )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Headshot)
Viewing the front side of the buildings on Main Street, Louisville, put it into perspective for me. Many of the businesses invested heavily in the appearance to impress potential customers. On much of Main Street, these frontages contain a surprise. They aren’t the original entrances.

1
 photo LouisvilleVisit355FCa.jpg

Read more... )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Headshot)
Here’s another gem from the past I’d forgotten about. Several years ago, while visiting family in the area, I took my daughter to explore a series of buildings in downtown Louisville I was surprised to see derelict. They were only a few blocks away from the YUM Center (Basketball arena) and in an area that had been full of clubs.

1
 photo LouisvilleVisit342FCa.jpg
Walking down the alley behind these buildings we spied an unusual sight

Read more... )
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A few years ago on a family visit, we stopped for gas at a station along the interstate highway. Across the street, was this derelict. It appears to have been closed for at least five years or more but because it was across the street from the 24 hour, super station, it hadn’t been vandalized.



The great American driving experience [10 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
Last year we had to evacuate from our house in Huntsville after tornados ravaged the area nearby. Without hope of electricity for a week, we drove south of the destruction to stay with relatives. While out on the road, we happened across the former S & H Mobile Homes or better known as the Clanton Drive-In Theater (http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/16227).



Friday night picture show, pass the pop corn [11 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
Continuing our exploration of the Chase Nursery complex we found some unique surprises

Chase Nursery appears to have finally foundered and declared bankruptcy in 1993. Since this was a family owned business, sorting out the business financials from the family’s took several years. Eventually portions of the property (including this one) were sold to a local university for agricultural uses.


Unpowered

Regrowth [18 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
On New Years Eve (31 Dec 10), I took my daughter out on a wander to the east side of town. Several places there had caught my interest over the past couple years and we needed some father - daughter time.


Barcoloungers on the Edge of Eternity

Chase Nursery was a massive operation that encompassed thousands of acres and employed hundreds worker. It was set up in the same manner as many of the southern mill towns of the same era (1880-1930's). It had a store, infirmary, and housing for the workers. The operation provided flowers and live plants to much of the eastern US via refrigerated railway cars from their own company siding (http://www.northalabamarailroadmuseum.com/restored.htm) through a succession of railroads. The Chase Nursery covered most of the land east of Monte Sano The Chase family and their business were so prominent that the northeastern 'burbs of Huntsville is called "Chase" and "Chase Gardens."

This to shall pass [14 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
In March, I had the pleasure of again shooting with model “Murder Doll” (http://www.modelmayhem.com/847538). Due to a number of reasons, she’d stepped back from modeling for almost a year. Because of her trust in my skill, she came back out to work with me.



[5 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
Rolling into Madison at the end of our wander, my son Chris and I choose to explore a site that my wife had pointed out to me the prior winter. The building appears to have been a home converted in a garden shop or a daycare. I lean towards garden shop. The business closed up when another business was built between it and the main road, cutting off access to customers. Had it not been for a Sunday and the newer business being closed, I’m sure that we would likely have attracted attention.


location, location, location! [21 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
As we moved past Athens, I noticed a complex of industrial buildings that seemed out of place near miles of farm fields. Then I realized this was a raw cotton mill. Many of these closed in the US during the 80’s and again in the late 90’s when cheap cotton from overseas and Mexico.



When cotton was king.. [15 behind the cut] )
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Shoot for a designer Hypnotic Designs in San Diego,CA
Model: Lolly Five
MUA: Kelsey South
Location: Lincoln Mills, Huntsville
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
Returning to the story of our summer wander across north Alabama, we got into Athens, Al and spied this old barn. My son and I pulled into a nearby mini-mall parking lot to scout it out. Since we observed a number of new "No Tresspass" signs around it and more than a few eyes on us, I had Chris stay with the car and took several photos quickly without entering the building which turned out to be a saw mill and machine shop.



Gone but not forgotten <img src= )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
Continuing our wander across north Alabama, we found a fireworks booth in front of devastated storefront. My son and I explored the place thoroughly and were impressed.


Taken by my son Chris; the sign reads “House of Games”

Where there’s smoke there’s fireworks.. [11 behind the cut] )
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
Happy New Year everyone! I’ve got some surprises for you. Right now, I’ve got 7 sites edited and uploaded for posting. Four more sets are awaiting my editing attention. I also found a set of files tucked away in a little used back-up directory. These included sets from 2007 at several sites in the Southern California desert. Needless to say, I’ll be contributing a bit more this year than before.

Last summer, following an interesting photo-shoot with several individuals, my son Chris and I decided to (finally) explore a number of locations on the hour drive from Florence, AL to Huntsville. The first place we looked at was the ‘historic’ Florence Railway Depot. Built to serve the line that ran from Memphis, TN to Chattanooga, TN, the depot was instrumental in moving goods from the many small local factories and raw cotton from fields around to the rest of the country.



Seen better daze.. [11 behind the cut] )
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Switching trains to nowhere..

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