jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
Just so folks don’t think I was going to post one set and disappear for several months, I’ve uploaded 7 more sets ready for posting besides this.

These are images from a family trip in 2009 to my old hometown. This electrical motor factory near downtown Louisville, was established in the 1930’s, moved to this site in 1948. According to conflicting reports this family business is still in operation but no longer manufactures motors and switching systems. It’s hard for me to believe it’s still operating at this site given the level damage and the amount of dust and webbing inside the main entrance. You be the judge.



Memories in stone and steel [11 behind the cut] )
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Lost Birmingham
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Tucked away on the Tennessee River is the remains of a former US Corps of Engineers maritime dock. As the area, was turned over to the city of Huntsville, the warehouse and fueling station became a forgotten part of a city park and riverwalk. Since the city had not use for it, the buildings were closed up and left to decay.


[15 behind the cut]  )
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Ladies and gents, the third shoot I did this month was with a truly amazing newcomer who goes by the nickname of "Imp." This was her first shoot and was supposed to be a test to check lighting and do a few costume shots. It grew a bit though. We did more because honestly, I was concerned that the amazing young lady was going to be moving away and not returning. As is I don't know whether I'll get the chance to work more with her. That seems up in the air.



A natural [16 behind the cut] )
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Given that southern California used to be a major oil producing region and there are many wells still operating here, I found it ironic to see a 60+ acre gasoline refinery completely decommissioned. The site was eerily quiet and surreal. Here’s the remainder of the site. Sorry for the delay, but getting ready to move is taking a large amount of time and planning.

The Refinery



Industrial decay [13 behind the cut] )
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Given that southern California used to be a major oil producing region and there are many wells still operating here, I found it ironic to see a 60+ acre gasoline refinery completely decommissioned. The site was eerily quiet and surreal. I’m breaking the refinery pictures into two sets merely for size of the download.

The Refinery



Industrial decay [21 behind the cut] )
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As mentioned before, on this trip, my partner and I visited 4 locations on and close to US Highway 395 in the western Mojave Desert.

1. The Hawes Communications Bunker (Visit #4 because she wanted to see it);
2. The Atolia Tungsten Mines (4 miles square – 100+ mine openings);
3. Randsburg, CA (A Class C “living” ghost town – 300 houses, 78 residents);
4. XXXXX Minimum Security Federal Prison Camp (This required two visits)

After a positively wonderful lunch at the Randsburg General Store, we headed back out of town. On the outskirts of town, we spotted a lone head frame for a mine and a single house about 100 yards away. We decided to explore.

Randsburg, California (Lost Mine)


Disconnected

Journey back to yesteryear (12 behind the cut) )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
As mentioned before, on this trip, my partner and I visited 4 locations on and close to US Highway 395 in the western Mojave Desert.

1. The Hawes Communications Bunker (Visit #4 because she wanted to see it);
2. The Atolia Tungsten Mines (4 miles square – 100+ mine openings);
3. Randsburg, CA (A Class C “living” ghost town – 300 houses, 78 residents);
4. XXXXX Minimum Security Federal Prison Camp (This required two visits)

Randsburg was once a boom town. The nearby gold mines were and are generally considered some of the richest in the country. At one time, the town once had over 2000 residents and 100+ operating mines. A number of these mines were/are right in the town. Today, Randsburg is a quiet shadow of it’s past. A number of hardy souls still live here. We were respectful about exploring in town as it’s difficult to point out some houses which are definitely abandoned, preserved or lived in.

Randsburg, California (Frozen in time)


Journey back to yesteryear (16 behind the cut) )
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As mentioned before, on this trip, my partner and I visited 4 locations on and close to US Highway 395 in the western Mojave Desert.


1. The Hawes Communications Bunker (Visit #4 because she wanted to see it);
2. The Atolia Tungsten Mines (4 miles square – 100+ mine openings);
3. Randsburg, CA (A Class C “living” ghost town – 300 houses, 78 residents);
4. XXXXX Minimum Security Federal Prison Camp (This required two visits)

The warehouses and sorting and ore sample storage buildings are nothing less than scary. In all but one case, the buildings are in final stages before structural failure. Walls are missing in some cases, ceilings have fallen and supports are sagging. In a windstorm this place must howl and sway like a banshee of Celtic lore. I’m sure it must equally scary to behold in person. Since posting the first set of photos, it’s been clarified that the site was essentially abandoned in the 50’s however very, very limited mine operations continued all the way thru the late 90’s. This was curtailed only a few years ago due vandalism, fires and theft by salvagers.

Atolia (The Wasteland – Warehouse Complexes)



Miles and miles, of miles and miles (16 behind the cut) )
jjmaccrimmon: (Default)
Like I said in previous posts, I was extremely busy this summer exploring and photographing places new and old. Normally I don’t like going back to old sites as I prefer to keep the image of the place locked from the first visit. On this trip, my partner and I visited 4 locations on and close to US Highway 395 in the western Mojave Desert.


1. The Hawes Communications Bunker (Visit #4 because she wanted to see it);
2. The Atolia Tungsten Mines (4 miles square – 100+ mine openings);
3. Randsburg, CA (A Class C “living” ghost town – 300 houses, 78 residents);
4. XXXXX Minimum Security Federal Prison Camp (This required two visits)

The Atolia Mine District could be easily described as a vast but unnoticed wasteland on the edge of US Hwy 395. To the untrained eye, the passerby on the highway would only see a few towers and a small, care-worn industrial complex. In fact, these few visible sites don’t truly indicate the extent of a nearly 40 square mile district that once included a town (west of the highway) and over 400 mine shafts or shallow drifts which employed nearly a thousand personnel.

Atolia (The Wasteland – Assayer and old foreman’s houses)



Miles and miles, of miles and miles (12 behind the cut) )
jjmaccrimmon: (Me - Shooting Profile)
Like I said in previous posts, I was extremely busy this summer exploring and photographing places new and old. Normally I don’t like going back to old sites as I prefer to keep the image of the place locked from the first visit. On this trip, my partner and I visited 4 locations on and close to US Highway 395 in the western Mojave Desert.


1. The Hawes Communications Bunker (Visit #4 because she wanted to see it);
2. The Atolia Tungsten Mines (4 miles square – 100+ mine openings);
3. Randsburg, CA (A Class C “living” ghost town – 300 houses, 78 residents);
4. XXXXX Minimum Security Federal Prison Camp (This required two visits)

The Atolia Mine District could be easily described as a vast but unnoticed wasteland on the edge of US Hwy 395. To the untrained eye, the passerby on the highway would only see a few towers and a small, care-worn industrial complex. In fact, these few visible sites don’t truly indicate the extent of a nearly 40 square mile district that once included a town (west of the highway) and over 400 mine shafts or shallow drifts which employed nearly a thousand personnel.

The area that we explored lay on the east side of the highway and required extreme caution. This area contained probably between 100 to 200 pits, shafts and drifts; numerous unstable piles of debris and mine tailings; equipment, and industrial waste. Boys and girls, this is a very dangerous place. Subsequent to our visit, I learned that the property is privately owned and that owner is well known for calling the county sheriff on anyone she sees in the complex.

Atolia (The Wasteland – Mines and exteriors)



Miles and miles, of miles and miles (20 behind the cut) )
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In mid-September, I gathered the family and we went back to the Revere Extrusion Facility to finish exploring the site in the daylight. When we got there, some things were subtly different. Multiple people had been at the building in the preceding weeks and had used it for creative purposes. It was also during this visit that Trish (a new explorer) found the documents that indicated what and when the plant was still in operation.



Curiouser and Curiouser [18 behind the cut] )
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The amazing thing about this place was not a sense of eeriness to accompany the wind generated “music.” Quite the contrary was a sense of almost profound calm. On this first visit, the Revere Plant left me feeling that it was merely waiting patiently for new industry to return and fill the shell that it had become. Not melancholy or sad, just patient. I’d later discover on another visit for follow up images (in September), that the old factory has seen more than a few uses since the last shipment of pipe was created from its long gone forming machines.



Industrial Decay [12 behind the cut] )
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My apologies about the long delay in continuing this wander I took in August.

When last our intrepid photographer updated, he was departing Felicia’s northern estate…

For the many folks who’ve commented about Felicia, thank very sincerely. I’m tempted to contact a videographer to shoot at several of these sites. “Her” story is one that I’m truly amazed by as well. Other than the September night hunt we attempted (which we shot), I haven’t had time to try and track her down further. Moving right along though..

After driving through Mojave, I was entirely planning to go home, climb in the tub and relax. Plan “B” caught my attention instead. Off in the distance, I noticed a complex that has intrigued me for years and finally decided to investigate. From a distance (several miles from the freeway), the site looks like a commercial poultry plant. I was oh so wrong. As I got closer, I was stunned at the size of the place.


No deliveries today

Industrial Decay [12 behind the cut] )

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